8 Rules of Fat Loss

Wednesday, March 6, 2013

Suggested Songs for March 10, 2013 Mass


March 10, 2013
4th Sunday of Lent/4th Sunday of Lent – Year A Scrutinies

Entrance:
1.       Tun-I Kami Ginoo
2.       Mag-awit Kita
3.       Dios Namo sa Kalooy
4.       Buksan ang Aming Puso (Tinio, Hontiveros)
5.       Blest be the Lord
6.       Seek the Lord (O’Connor)
                  
First Reading                                      JOS 5:9A, 10-12
The LORD said to Joshua,
“Today I have removed the reproach of Egypt from you.”

While the Israelites were encamped at Gilgal on the plains of Jericho,
they celebrated the Passover
on the evening of the fourteenth of the month.
On the day after the Passover,
they ate of the produce of the land
in the form of unleavened cakes and parched grain.
On that same day after the Passover,
on which they ate of the produce of the land, the manna ceased.
No longer was there manna for the Israelites,
who that year ate of the yield of the land of Canaan.

Responsorial Psalm                           PS 34:2-3, 4-5, 6-7
R. (9a) Taste and see the goodness of the Lord.
I will bless the LORD at all times;
his praise shall be ever in my mouth.
Let my soul glory in the LORD;
the lowly will hear me and be glad.
R. Taste and see the goodness of the Lord.
Glorify the LORD with me,
let us together extol his name.
I sought the LORD, and he answered me
and delivered me from all my fears.
R. Taste and see the goodness of the Lord.
Look to him that you may be radiant with joy,
and your faces may not blush with shame.
When the poor one called out, the LORD heard,
and from all his distress he saved him.
R. Taste and see the goodness of the Lord.

Second Reading                                  2 COR 5:17-21
Brothers and sisters:
Whoever is in Christ is a new creation:
the old things have passed away;
behold, new things have come.
And all this is from God,
who has reconciled us to himself through Christ
and given us the ministry of reconciliation,
namely, God was reconciling the world to himself in Christ,
not counting their trespasses against them
and entrusting to us the message of reconciliation.
So we are ambassadors for Christ,
as if God were appealing through us.
We implore you on behalf of Christ,
be reconciled to God.
For our sake he made him to be sin who did not know sin,
so that we might become the righteousness of God in him.

Gospel                                                                   LK 15:1-3, 11-32
Tax collectors and sinners were all drawing near to listen to Jesus,
but the Pharisees and scribes began to complain, saying,
“This man welcomes sinners and eats with them.”
So to them Jesus addressed this parable:
“A man had two sons, and the younger son said to his father,
‘Father give me the share of your estate that should come to me.’
So the father divided the property between them.
After a few days, the younger son collected all his belongings
and set off to a distant country
where he squandered his inheritance on a life of dissipation.
When he had freely spent everything,
a severe famine struck that country,
and he found himself in dire need.
So he hired himself out to one of the local citizens
who sent him to his farm to tend the swine.
And he longed to eat his fill of the pods on which the swine fed,
but nobody gave him any.
Coming to his senses he thought,
‘How many of my father’s hired workers
have more than enough food to eat,
but here am I, dying from hunger.
I shall get up and go to my father and I shall say to him,
“Father, I have sinned against heaven and against you.
I no longer deserve to be called your son;
treat me as you would treat one of your hired workers.”’
So he got up and went back to his father.
While he was still a long way off,
his father caught sight of him, and was filled with compassion.
He ran to his son, embraced him and kissed him.
His son said to him,
‘Father, I have sinned against heaven and against you;
I no longer deserve to be called your son.’
But his father ordered his servants,
‘Quickly bring the finest robe and put it on him;
put a ring on his finger and sandals on his feet.
Take the fattened calf and slaughter it.
Then let us celebrate with a feast,
because this son of mine was dead, and has come to life again;
he was lost, and has been found.’
Then the celebration began.
Now the older son had been out in the field
and, on his way back, as he neared the house,
he heard the sound of music and dancing.
He called one of the servants and asked what this might mean.
The servant said to him,
‘Your brother has returned
and your father has slaughtered the fattened calf
because he has him back safe and sound.’
He became angry,
and when he refused to enter the house,
his father came out and pleaded with him.
He said to his father in reply,
‘Look, all these years I served you
and not once did I disobey your orders;
yet you never gave me even a young goat to feast on with my friends.
But when your son returns
who swallowed up your property with prostitutes,
for him you slaughter the fattened calf.’
He said to him,
‘My son, you are here with me always;
everything I have is yours.
But now we must celebrate and rejoice,
because your brother was dead and has come to life again;
he was lost and has been found.’”

Or for Year A -Scrutiny Readings

First Reading                                                      1 SM 16:1B, 6-7, 10-13A
The LORD said to Samuel:
“Fill your horn with oil, and be on your way.
I am sending you to Jesse of Bethlehem,
for I have chosen my king from among his sons.”

As Jesse and his sons came to the sacrifice,
Samuel looked at Eliab and thought,
“Surely the LORD’s anointed is here before him.”
But the LORD said to Samuel:
“Do not judge from his appearance or from his lofty stature,
because I have rejected him.
Not as man sees does God see,
because man sees the appearance
but the LORD looks into the heart.”
In the same way Jesse presented seven sons before Samuel,
but Samuel said to Jesse,
“The LORD has not chosen any one of these.”
Then Samuel asked Jesse,
“Are these all the sons you have?”
Jesse replied,
“There is still the youngest, who is tending the sheep.”
Samuel said to Jesse,
“Send for him;
we will not begin the sacrificial banquet until he arrives here.”
Jesse sent and had the young man brought to them.
He was ruddy, a youth handsome to behold
and making a splendid appearance.
The LORD said,
“There—anoint him, for this is the one!”
Then Samuel, with the horn of oil in hand,
anointed David in the presence of his brothers;
and from that day on, the spirit of the LORD rushed upon David.

Responsorial Psalm                                           PS 23: 1-3A, 3B-4, 5, 6
R. (1) The Lord is my shepherd; there is nothing I shall want.
The LORD is my shepherd; I shall not want.
In verdant pastures he gives me repose;
beside restful waters he leads me;
he refreshes my soul.
R. The Lord is my shepherd; there is nothing I shall want.
He guides me in right paths
for his name’s sake.
Even though I walk in the dark valley
I fear no evil; for you are at my side
With your rod and your staff
that give me courage.
R. The Lord is my shepherd; there is nothing I shall want.
You spread the table before me
in the sight of my foes;
you anoint my head with oil;
my cup overflows.
R. The Lord is my shepherd; there is nothing I shall want.
Only goodness and kindness follow me
all the days of my life;
and I shall dwell in the house of the LORD
for years to come.
R. The Lord is my shepherd; there is nothing I shall want.

Second Reading                                                  EPH 5:8-14
Brothers and sisters:
You were once darkness,
but now you are light in the Lord.
Live as children of light,
for light produces every kind of goodness
and righteousness and truth.
Try to learn what is pleasing to the Lord.
Take no part in the fruitless works of darkness;
rather expose them, for it is shameful even to mention
the things done by them in secret;
but everything exposed by the light becomes visible,
for everything that becomes visible is light.
Therefore, it says:
“Awake, O sleeper,
and arise from the dead,
and Christ will give you light.”

Gospel                                                                   JN 9:1-41
As Jesus passed by he saw a man blind from birth.
His disciples asked him,
“Rabbi, who sinned, this man or his parents,
that he was born blind?”
Jesus answered,
“Neither he nor his parents sinned;
it is so that the works of God might be made visible through him.
We have to do the works of the one who sent me while it is day.
Night is coming when no one can work.
While I am in the world, I am the light of the world.”
When he had said this, he spat on the ground
and made clay with the saliva,
and smeared the clay on his eyes,
and said to him,
“Go wash in the Pool of Siloam” —which means Sent—.
So he went and washed, and came back able to see.

His neighbors and those who had seen him earlier as a beggar said,
“Isn’t this the one who used to sit and beg?”
Some said, “It is, “
but others said, “No, he just looks like him.”
He said, “I am.”
So they said to him, “How were your eyes opened?”
He replied,
“The man called Jesus made clay and anointed my eyes
and told me, ‘Go to Siloam and wash.’
So I went there and washed and was able to see.”
And they said to him, “Where is he?”
He said, “I don’t know.”

They brought the one who was once blind to the Pharisees.
Now Jesus had made clay and opened his eyes on a sabbath.
So then the Pharisees also asked him how he was able to see.
He said to them,
“He put clay on my eyes, and I washed, and now I can see.”
So some of the Pharisees said,
“This man is not from God,
because he does not keep the sabbath.”
But others said,
“How can a sinful man do such signs?”
And there was a division among them.
So they said to the blind man again,
“What do you have to say about him,
since he opened your eyes?”
He said, “He is a prophet.”

Now the Jews did not believe
that he had been blind and gained his sight
until they summoned the parents of the one who had gained his sight.
They asked them,
“Is this your son, who you say was born blind?
How does he now see?”
His parents answered and said,
“We know that this is our son and that he was born blind.
We do not know how he sees now,
nor do we know who opened his eyes.
Ask him, he is of age;
he can speak for himself.”
His parents said this because they were afraid
of the Jews, for the Jews had already agreed
that if anyone acknowledged him as the Christ,
he would be expelled from the synagogue.
For this reason his parents said,
“He is of age; question him.”

So a second time they called the man who had been blind
and said to him, “Give God the praise!
We know that this man is a sinner.”
He replied,
“If he is a sinner, I do not know.
One thing I do know is that I was blind and now I see.”
So they said to him,
“What did he do to you?
How did he open your eyes?”
He answered them,
“I told you already and you did not listen.
Why do you want to hear it again?
Do you want to become his disciples, too?”
They ridiculed him and said,
“You are that man’s disciple;
we are disciples of Moses!
We know that God spoke to Moses,
but we do not know where this one is from.”
The man answered and said to them,
“This is what is so amazing,
that you do not know where he is from, yet he opened my eyes.
We know that God does not listen to sinners,
but if one is devout and does his will, he listens to him.
It is unheard of that anyone ever opened the eyes of a person born blind.
If this man were not from God,
he would not be able to do anything.”
They answered and said to him,
“You were born totally in sin,
and are you trying to teach us?”
Then they threw him out.

When Jesus heard that they had thrown him out,
he found him and said, “Do you believe in the Son of Man?”
He answered and said,
“Who is he, sir, that I may believe in him?”
Jesus said to him,
“You have seen him,
the one speaking with you is he.”
He said,
“I do believe, Lord,” and he worshiped him.
Then Jesus said,
“I came into this world for judgment,
so that those who do not see might see,
and those who do see might become blind.”

Some of the Pharisees who were with him heard this
and said to him, “Surely we are not also blind, are we?”
Jesus said to them,
“If you were blind, you would have no sin;
but now you are saying, ‘We see,’ so your sin remains.

Or                                                           JN 9:1, 6-9, 13-17, 34-38
As Jesus passed by he saw a man blind from birth.
He spat on the ground and made clay with the saliva,
and smeared the clay on his eyes,
and said to him,
“Go wash in the Pool of Siloam” — which means Sent —.
So he went and washed, and came back able to see.

His neighbors and those who had seen him earlier as a beggar said,
“Isn’t this the one who used to sit and beg?”
Some said, “It is, “
but others said, “No, he just looks like him.”
He said, “I am.”

They brought the one who was once blind to the Pharisees.
Now Jesus had made clay and opened his eyes on a sabbath.
So then the Pharisees also asked him how he was able to see.
He said to them,
“He put clay on my eyes, and I washed, and now I can see.”
So some of the Pharisees said,
“This man is not from God,
because he does not keep the sabbath.”
But others said,
“How can a sinful man do such signs?”
And there was a division among them.
So they said to the blind man again,
“What do you have to say about him,
since he opened your eyes?”
He said, “He is a prophet.”

They answered and said to him,
“You were born totally in sin,
and are you trying to teach us?”
Then they threw him out.

When Jesus heard that they had thrown him out,
he found him and said, “Do you believe in the Son of Man?”
He answered and said,
“Who is he, sir, that I may believe in him?”
Jesus said to him,
“You have seen him, and
the one speaking with you is he.”
He said,
“I do believe, Lord,” and he worshiped him.

Homily for 4th Sunday of Lent Readings:

My brothers and sisters, from one of today's readings, I call to your attention a very special Bible verse, "If anyone is in Christ, there is a new creation; everything old has passed away; everything has become new!" [2 Cor. 5:17] This one passage summarizes God's Divine Plan for man. Having its origin in the prophesies of the Old Testament, being fulfilled through Jesus Christ, it explains how we have become today's new creations of God.

I have come to the conclusion that very few Christians truly knows and understands what it means that if anyone is in Christ, there is a new creation. I am not denying that in faith, most Christians accept this as a doctrinal truth. What I am saying is that few understand what really happens through the Sacrament of Baptism during the process of our having died with Christ, our having been buried with Christ and our having risen as a new creation with Christ. [Rom. 6:4]

Allow me to explain myself. In the beginning, "the Lord God formed man from the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and the man became a living being." [Gen. 2:7] In other words, God created a physical body, gave it a "human spirit" [Job 32:8; Prov. 18:14, 20:27; Ecc. 3:21; Eze. 11:19, 36:26; Zech. 12:1; Mal. 2:15; Mt. 26:41; Lk. 8:55; Jn. 3:6; Rom. 8:15; 1 Cor. 2:11] and it became a living soul. [Lk. 1:46-7; 1 Thess. 5:23; Heb. 4:12] God created man with a soul, his self-consciousness, a physical body and a human spirit to sustain the life of the body. For a body without a (human) spirit is dead. [Jas. 2:26] As Jesus said, "It is the spirit that gives life; the flesh is useless." [Jn. 6:63]

From the Book of Genesis, we also learn that God created man holy in nature in His likeness. [Gen. 1:26; 5:1] And God saw that all what He had made was good. [Gen. 1:31]

After God completed the creation of all things, He placed Adam in the Garden of Eden [Gen. 2:15] and commanded, "You may freely eat of every tree of the garden; but of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil you shall not eat, for in the day that you eat of it you shall die." [Gen. 2:16-7]

As we all know, Adam and Eve disobeyed God by eating of the tree of knowledge and sin entered the world. At that moment, Satan became the "prince of the world" [Jn. 12:31] Adam and Eve lost their original nature of holiness in the likeness of God. In punishment for disobeying, God removed Adam and Eve from the Garden of Eden [Gen. 3:23] and said, "You shall eat bread until you return to the ground, for out of it you were taken; you are dust, and to dust you shall return." [Gen. 3:19]

Here is where we begin to discover the mystery of man's creation. When God said that man is dust and he shall return to dust, God meant that all the descendants of Adam would experience spiritual death, being deprived of the eternal beatific vision of God in His eternal Kingdom."

According to the teachings of St. Thomas Aquinas, "In virtue of its specific nature, the intellectual soul does not possess the body as a part of itself, but has only an aptitude for union with the body." (Extracted from: "The first part of 'Light Of Faith: The Compendium Of Theology' by St. Thomas Aquinas"; # 85. Unity of the possible intellect.)

The soul, formless in nature, needs a body, either physical or spiritual, to manifest itself. Both, the physical body of man, and his human spirit that gives life to the physical body, were stained by the original sin of Adam. As such, they were called to experience physical and spiritual death. Without a spiritual body that is free of sin, as defined by the Council of Trent, (C.C.C.) the soul of man is called to experience "the death of the soul" in the absence of the eternal beatific vision of God.

Now, when God saw the magnitude of what Satan had done by introducing sin into the world, immediately, God had another plan in motion. God did not desire to let man experience spiritual death in the absence of His eternal love and presence.

Beginning in the days of Jeremiah, followed by the days of Ezekiel, God promised to give man a new heart which is synonym to a new spiritual nature (or mind). Then, God promised to give man a new human spirit. Finally, God promised to place His Spirit within man to dwell within him. [Ezek. 11:19-20, 18:31, 36:26; Jer. 24:7, 31:33; Heb. 10:16] Finally, God promised to "sprinkle clean water upon us, and we shall be clean from all our uncleannesses." [Ezek. 36:25]

Now notice what I am saying here because this is very important. The soul of man cannot enjoy the eternal beatific vision as long as it possesses its spirit that has been stained by the original sin. In view of this, God promised to give man a new human spirit. Why? For the soul to continue to manifest itself in a new spiritual form after the death of the physical body. That is what the Sacrament of Baptism is all about. Unless we are born again, we have no life in us. "No one can enter the Kingdom of God without being born of water and Spirit." [Jn. 3:5] "What is born of the flesh is flesh, and what is born of the Spirit is (human) spirit." [Jn. 3:5] In the Most Holy Name of Jesus, by the grace of the Heavenly Father, through the power of the Holy Spirit, during the Sacrament of Baptism, we received a newly created human spirit from the Holy Spirit.

Speaking of this marvellous gift of the human spirit, today's Second Reading from the Second Letter to the Corinthians says, "If anyone is in Christ, there is a new creation: everything old has passed away; see, everything has become new!" [2 Cor. 5:17] Indeed, everything has become new because in Christ, over and above having received the indwelling Holy Spirit, we have received a new spiritual nature, a new human spirit for the soul, now free of original sin, to qualify in the inheritance of the Kingdom of God after physical death. "All this is from God, who reconciled us to Himself through Christ, and has given us the ministry of reconciliation; that is, in Christ, God was reconciling the world to Himself, not counting their trespasses against them, and entrusting the message of reconciliation to us." [2 Cor. 5:18-9]

My brothers and sisters, "our new creation is everything!" [Gal. 6:15; 2 Cor. 5:17] Our new human spirit, free of original sin through the Sacrament of Baptism, is a gift of God of the godly seed. [1 Jn. 3:9] As Jesus said in the Parable of the Weeds, [Mt. 13:24-30, 36-43] "The one who sows the good seed is the Son of man; the field is the world, and the good seed are the children of the Kingdom." [Mt. 13:37-8] "You have been born anew, not of perishable but of imperishable seed, through the living and enduring Word of God." [1 Pet. 1:23] "This means that it is not the children of the flesh who are the children of God..." [Rom. 9:8]

Knowing this, you now understand why we are ambassadors for Christ. On behalf of Christ, God is making His appeal through us, to urge all to be reconciled to God. For our sake God made Christ to be sin who knew no sin, so that in Christ we might become the righteousness of God.

My brothers and sisters, this week, as we reflect upon the Word of God that we have heard today, we should remind ourselves of the urgency for all to receive the Sacrament of Baptism so that they too may be reconciled with God. We should ask ourselves, "Do I know someone who is not baptized because of neglect?" If we do, as ambassadors for Christ, we have an obligation to spread the good news and to convince those around us, our loved ones, our friends, our co-workers, that it is urgent for them to be baptized. It is urgent that they receive the free gifts of God. It is urgent because should they die today or tomorrow without their new creation, their souls will be deprived of the eternal beatific vision of God in communion with all the angels and saints.

Throughout the centuries, Christians have worried about what happens to the babies who die without being baptized. Today, knowing that we are all entitled to a new creation, we should worry about what will happen to all the children and adults who die without having been baptized. May the grace of God touch them before it is too late!

Homily for 4th Sunday of Lent – Year A Scrutinies Readings:

My brothers and sisters, the faithful members of the parish prayerfully long for the day when you as candidates for the Sacrament of Baptism shall be reborn into the life of the Kingdom of God. Through your membership in the R.C.I.A., we are reminded of the grace of God that is continuously manifested in each and everyone of us. Through your spiritual growth, we perceive the infinite grace of God that continues to manifest itself in creation, in the world and in the Holy Catholic Church.

Today's readings speak of the manifestation of the grace of God. During the First Reading, [1 Sam. 16:1, 6-7, 10-13] we heard of the circumstances when God sent Samuel to anoint as king one of the sons of Jesse of Bethlehem. The one that God called to serve Him as king was not the one that Samuel believed would be called. For the Lord does not see as mortals see. Mortals look at the outward appearance of the person. But the Lord looks at the heart.

The anointing of king David is symbolic to the Sacrament of Baptism. As we have heard during the First Reading, the Spirit of the Lord came mightily upon David from the day that he was anointed. To be anointed means to have been called and to have answered the calling. It means to become a new creation in Jesus. It means to receive the indwelling gift of the Holy Spirit who shall move upon those who give their lives in the service of the Lord Jesus Christ and the Church that He has instituted on earth. 

Through the aforementioned, we see the manifestation of the grace of God at work,

1) in the calling of king David,
2) in his answering of the calling,
3) in his anointing through Samuel, an instrument of God,
4) in the new birth that results in a new creation,
5) in the indwelling of the Holy Spirit,
6) and in the living faith of the new candidate who shines forth to bear spiritual fruits throughout his life.

For the grace of God to continue to manifest itself through us, we must always embrace a spiritual heart. Through a spiritual disposition, we strive to find out what is pleasing to the Lord so we can live as children of the light.

Once, we lived in the darkness as many still do. We were lost souls. We had no living hope of salvation and eternal life in the Kingdom of God. But now, through the grace of God that is manifested in the Lord Jesus, we are as lights in the world. As lights, we are called to shine by doing what is good, right, and true, so that we may bear the fruit of the light. Nobody lights up a candle and places it under a bushel to hide its light. Nor does the Lord Jesus transform us into lights in the world so we may go and hide in a closet. We are called to publicly serve the Lord Jesus in full submission and obedience.

We, the faithful of this parish, were once sleepers. By the grace of God who had mercy on our poor souls, we were called to awaken. And we responded to the Lord's call. Soon, others will join us through faith in Jesus and the Sacrament of Baptism. They too were once sleepers who have been awakened. Before long, with our new members of the Body of Christ, we will all be rejoicing together. Through our increased number, our light shall increase in the world, the Church becoming more visible to those who still need to be brought to the light of Christ.

Today's Gospel Reading reported the event surrounding the man who was cured from the blindness that he had since childbirth. Thinking worldly, some of the disciples were ready to blame someone for the cause of this blindness. They asked Jesus, "Who sinned, this man or his parents, that he was born blind?" Jesus answered, "Neither this man nor his parents sinned: he was born blind so that God's works might be revealed in him."

The man was born blind so that the grace of God may be manifested through him. Through this man, the glory of God was seen by all who knew him prior to being healed. Through this miracle, the faith of many was strengthened. This is the power behind the manifestation of the grace of God.

We too sometimes hear of misfortune that struck someone, and as some of the disciples of Jesus believed, thinking worldly, we immediately jump to a conclusion. Why is someone sick? Why is another one a handicap? Why has someone we know lost his job? Thinking worldly, we immediately judge and draw a conclusion. But is that right?

Should we not be embracing a spiritual heart and ask ourselves, "How is the grace of God being manifested through these events?"

You know, I once heard that if there were no poor people in the world, we would be unable to give to the poor! Think of this! Everytime you give to a poor person, the grace of God is being manifested in you and through you. Now, take away the poor... and what happens? God's grace can no longer be manifested in you and through you under these circumstances.

So why does God allow someone to be sick, handicapped or unemployed? Maybe because He wants His infinite grace to shine in you and through you. Maybe He is waiting for you to help care for the children of the mother or father who is ill. Maybe He is waiting for you to help and support the parents of a handicap child. Or even, maybe He expects you to share your excess wealth by providing food, clothing, or a birthday present to the family who's bread winner is presently unemployed.

As lights in the world, you are called to do these things. If we stop visiting the sick in the hospital, the seniors in the lodges, the prisoners who have been given up by the world, who shall be their lights? Do we then have the right to call ourselves Christians if we close our eyes to the needs of those around us? No, we do not have the right to do so and nor can we do so! As new creations who have been born again in Christ, our hearts tell us to show love towards others as Christ has shown love towards us by dying in our place on the Holy Cross.

God wants His grace to be manifested through us. God calls everyone to be touched by His undeserved free grace. He calls us to repent of our sins and to confess them. He calls us to behave as new creations that enjoy the indwelling Divine presence of the Holy Spirit. And He calls us to persevere in our living faith in Christ... all this so His grace may be manifested through us. 

My brothers and sisters, as we continue with the celebration of the Holy Mass, let us reflect on how the grace of God is being manifested in us through the Sacrament of the Holy Eucharist, the great Feast of the Lord Jesus. Let us impatiently wait with great excitement for the day when our new brothers and sisters will be able to share with us in the joy of our living hope in Christ so that the grace of the Lord may abundantly flourish through them as it flourishes through us.

Offertory:
1.       Dios Dawata
2.       Aniang among Halad
3.       Diyutay Lang Kini
4.       Sumasamo Kami (Judan)
5.       Panginoon Narito Ako
6.       Unang Alay (modified version)
7.       Now We Remain (Haas)
8.       Take Our Bread (Wise)


Communion:
1.       Kini Maong Akong Lawas
2.       Kinabuhi mo Kinabuhi Ko
3.       Ako ang Kahayag
4.       Balaan nga Gugma
5.       Ang Ginoo akong Magbalantay
6.       Dios Namo sa Kalooy
7.       Awit ng Paghilom (Aquino)
8.       Maging akin Muli (Aquino)
9.       Dakilang Pag-ibig (Pangilinan, Hontiveros) Prioritize Stanza 2. Swak sa 2R.
10.    Likhain mong Muli (Alejo, Francisco)
11.    God of Silence (Francisco)
12.    Taste and See
13.    Empty Space (Go, Francisco)

Recessional:
1.       Kinsa?
2.       Ang Atong Tulubagon
3.       Alay sa Kapwa (Esteban, Hontiveros) Prioritize Stanza 3.
4.       Save Us, O Lord (Dufford)

2 comments :

  1. anung pong blest be the lord ? yung kay Dan Schutte or yunhgisa??

    ReplyDelete
  2. Dan Schutte

    pampalit ng Aleluya pwede ung
    "Thy Word is the lamp to my feet and a light unto my path"

    ReplyDelete

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